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Marcellus shale leads nat gas production per rig

March 13, 2014 - Ben Klein
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014 Drilling Productivity Report:

The productivity of oil and natural gas wells is steadily increasing in many basins across the United States because of the increasing precision and efficiency of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in oil and natural gas extraction. Many resource-producing basins are experiencing an increasing yield over time in either oil (Bakken, Eagle Ford, Niobrara) or natural gas (Marcellus, Haynesville).

The geology of each oil and natural gas resource play is diverse, and individual rig or well performance can vary dramatically. However, drilling activity in U.S. shale plays is now generally producing greater quantities of oil and/or natural gas than in the past.

As noted in March's productivity report, five of the six U.S. shale plays tracked by the DPR have seen increases in oil and natural gas production per rig over the past few years. According to EIA's March DPR, the Eagle Ford Shale is leading in increased production of oil per rig, and the Marcellus Shale is leading in increased production of natural gas per rig.

State Impact reports the increase is due to infrastructure to move the gas to consumers:

Rigs are producing more gas because more infrastructure is coming on line, according to EIA economist Mike Ford.

“The ability to take gas out of the ground has been there for a while,” he says. “Now we actually have compressor stations, pipelines, and gathering lines to process it and take it to consumers.”

 
 

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The Marcellus shale leads natural gas production per rig when compared to other major shale plays in the U.S.

 
 
 
 

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