Our Opinion

Our Opinion: Approve the bill

Opponents of a measure to make it easier for military veterans to see private-sector health care providers instead of relying on the Department of Veterans Affairs have one big complaint: Doing that could lead to privatizing the VA, they complain. Horrors! Take control of veterans’ health ...

Our Opinion: If not now, when? 

We’ve had a day to step back and reflect on Monday evening’s meeting of the Warren County School District board of directors. We’ve digested the fact that kids will be dropping out of school in droves if they lose their high school bands. We’ve stomached the fact that roughly one ...

Our Opinion: Dangerous

As former President Barack Obama reduced emphasis on space exploration during his administration, we were among those warning of the danger of doing away with a self-contained program. Too much reliance on Russia and other nations to handle space-related tasks could be dangerous, we ...

Our Opinion: Painting into corners

Former President Barack Obama and his aides were very good at one thing — painting the nation into corners. They did it with health care, their campaign against coal and affordable electricity, and their deal with Iran. Irreparable damage was done in every case. It remains for President ...

Our Opinion: Unacceptable

Many victims of sexual assault or harassment do not come forward because they are afraid of retaliation. One might suppose that if any employer could protect them, it would be the U.S. military. But the number of armed service members reporting they were retaliated against for filing sexual ...

Our Opinion: How important?

Red wolves once were common in Southeast states. By 1980, they were considered extinct in the wild. That resulted in establishment of a captive breeding program meant to establish a new population of the animals in an area of eastern North Carolina. In 1987, the captive breeding program began ...

Our Opinion: Our schools need to be

Safety against violent intruders has become a major concern in planning construction of new schools and renovation of existing ones. That can mean expensive provisions such as “mantrap” entrances and metal detectors. Let us not overlook the little things. A commission investigating ...

Our Opinion: More power?

Big government’s standard answer for any problem is to insist it needs more power, usually in the form of additional burdensome regulations. Time and time again, however, the public sees clearly that the problem is ineffective enforcement of existing rules. The ongoing scandal involving ...

Our Opinion: Tough stand

North Korea’s claim it will suspend testing of nuclear weapons is the show of good faith that absolutely had to precede direct talks between that country’s dictator, Kim Jong Un, and U.S. President Donald Trump. But Trump is right to adopt what, at first glance, may seem to be a ...

Our Opinion: Too long

In August, the Federal Aviation Administration proposed making ultrasonic inspections of the fan blades in Boeing 737 aircraft engines mandatory. The agency never issued a final decision, however. The engine’s manufacturer had recommended such inspections be conducted within a year. On ...

Our Opinion: Genuine

Barbara Bush was more than a beloved first lady to many Americans. In some ways, she felt like the first grandmother. Bush died this week at age 92, after instructing her doctors to stop treatment that might have prolonged her life. It was typical of a woman who, while in the White House, ...

Our Opinion: Hiding the truth?

Syrian officials insist they did not use chemical weapons against civilians on April 7. Russian and Iranian leaders back them up. One Russian official accused the United States, England and France of having an ulterior motive for their missile attack on Syria last week. It was an attempt to ...

Our Opinion: Diplomacy working

One chorus in which President Donald Trump’s critics delight in singing is that he is ruining our relationships with other countries. Not really. Consider what happened Friday and Saturday: That night, armed forces from the United States, England and France joined in an attack on chemical ...

Our Opinion: Bitter frame of mind

House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan said this week he is leaving Congress because he doesn’t want his children to reach adulthood having experienced only a “weekend dad.” After 20 years in Congress, Ryan’s decision is understandable in that light. But one wonders if Ryan, ...

Our Opinion: Wait and see

Diplomats in many other countries learned the secret to good relations with the United States years ago: Tell the Americans what they want to hear. So the small victory President Donald Trump has won in the so-called “trade war” he initiated needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Time ...

Our Opinion: Priorities

Federal officials plan to spend $4.6 billion to battle the opioid addiction crisis this year. That represents a substantial new emphasis on dealing with a very real crisis. But is it enough? Drug abuse is killing about 42,000 people a year in the United States. Yet much more federal money ...

Our Opinion: My mistake

If you want an idea of the magnitude of the privacy scandal involving Facebook, consider this: There are about 117 million households in the United States, according to the Census Bureau. As many as 87 million people, most in this country, had personal data collected by Facebook accessed by ...

Our Opinion: A reminder

Officials in Los Alamos, N.M., have turned down an offer to host a traveling exhibit on a subject both disturbing and important. It was near Los Alamos that, in 1945, a nuclear bomb was tested. That led to the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, that ended World War II. Use ...

Our Opinion: We have to do better

Some who remember the shock and horror of what happened 50 years ago today, the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., may wonder how he would view the situation today. He would be enormously pleased at one aspect of the relationship between white Americans and ...

Our Opinion: Finding the key

London, England, is reminding Americans that gun control does not translate automatically to reducing violence. In London, where firearms limits are far stricter than in the United States, there were 37 homicides during February and March. In New York City, the number was 35. Thirty-one ...